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Using urine to make sub-Saharan city region food systems more sustainable

Installing urine collection systems in sub-Saharan city regions would make those conurbations more sustainable. This was demonstrated by a study by four researchers from CIRAD, IRD, Boubakar Bâ University of Tillaberi (Niger) and Joseph Ki-Zerbo University, Ouagadougou (Burkina Faso), published on 3 May 2023 in the journal Regional Environmental Change.

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Müllerian mimicry among bees and wasps: a review of current knowledge and future avenues of research

A study in Biological Reviews led by researchers from the Institute of ecology and environmental sciences – Paris, the Institute of Systematics, Evolution, Biodiversity and the Center for Ecology and Conservation Sciences makes the synthesis of published knowledge on Mullerian mimicry in aculeate wasps and bees. It argues that aculeates may be one of the most diverse groups of mimetic organisms and that the diversity of their mimetic interactions is currently underexplored.

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Membre de iEES Paris présents à l'EGU2023

iEES Paris at EGU 2023

EGU 2023 was held this year in Vienna, Austria from April 23-28. iEES Paris was strongly represented with the participation of 9 of our team members.

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Florence Débarre, CNRS bronze medal !

The bronze medal rewards initial research that has established a researcher as a specialist in their field. This distinction is a form of encouragement to pursue research that is already well underway and proving successful.

Florence Débarre, CNRS researcher at iEES Paris, is one of the 2022 CNRS talents rewarded for her research in evolutionary ecology and epidemiology and its implications for better understanding the evolution of the COVID19 virus.

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The invasion of hammerhead flatworms is not over yet

In the the last years, predatory land flatworms have been introduced in many locations because of the trade of exotic plants. In this article published in Diversity and Distributions, a collaboration between iEES Paris, the National Museum of Natural History and James Cook University aimed to model the global invasion risk of these species. It turns out that they have not colonised all regions at risk yet, which demonstrates a need for increased vigilance in these areas.

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